North America's Next Magnesium Oxide Mine

MGX controls the majority of known magnesite occurrences throughout British Columbia as reported by the British Columbia Geological Survey (BCGS). Exploration and advancement of these prospects is key to building long-term value in our portfolio of magnesium assets.


The Driftwood mining district is accessible by an established network of paved highways and logging roads. The CPR rail line and power transmission lines run parallel to Highway 95, the main north-south road running through the district.

Mining and logging within the Driftwood district dates back to the early 1900’s. The discovery of magnesite was first reported in the mid-1920’s (Walker, 1926). The majority of magnesite prospects throughout the district appear to be hosted in the Precambrian Aged Mount Nelson Formation (Kikauka, 2000).


Marysville
The Marysville magnesium claims cover 480 hectares (1,190 acres). Marysville is located 25 kilometers north of Cranbrook, British Columbia and features a stratabound layer of magnesite mineralization hosted in the Lower Cambrian Cranbrook Formation. This mineralized structure spans approximately 10-20 meters in width across an intermittent strike length of 4.5 kilometers. COMINCO historically excavated a 2,700 tonne bulk sample on the northern portion of the deposit.

Field Reconnaissance Results

Sample

Prospect

Al2O3%

CaO%

Fe2O3%

MgO%

SiO2%

MARY-15-AR-1

Marysville

0.47

1.02

1.04

40.7

11.63

MARY-15-AR-2

Marysville

0.88

0.94

0.67

44.8

3.53

MARY-15-AR-3

Marysville

0.67

0.56

1.80

44.3

2.91

MARY-15-AR-4

Marysville

1.1

0.62

0.81

44.9

3.20

MARY-15-AR-5

Marysville

0.60

0.56

0.92

45.0

2.70

 

      

Red Mountain
B.C. MINFILE No. 082KNE034: The Red Mountain occurrence consists of a 12 to 28 metre thick by a 365 metre long zone of coarsely crystalline magnesite near the top of the Proterozoic Mount Nelson Formation. The magnesite is massive pearl-white, coarsely crystalline with a buff colored weathered surface. It grades laterally into a grey, psuedo-fenestral dolomite and is underlain by a fine- grained dolomite with 1 to 5 centimetre thick chert lenses. Magnesite occurs as one centimetre long crystals and appears to replace dolomite near the basal contact. Locally the larger crystals within a matrix of 0.5 millimetre grains of magnesite give a distinct "porphyritic" (bimodal?) appearance. Considerable silica is present as scattered remnants of cherty patches.

Field Reconnaissance Results

Sample

Prospect

Al2O3%

CaO%

Fe2O3%

MgO%

SiO2%

14RED-1

Red Mountain

0.29

1.06

1.43

40.0

10.4

14RED-2

Red Mountain

0.16

1.35

1.57

39.2

12.0

14RED-3

Red Mountain

0.63

0.6

0.84

40.5

10.7

14RED-4

Red Mountain

0.19

0.49

1.01

38.0

17.4

14RED-5

Red Mountain

0.78

0.77

1.12

41.0

8.89

 

          

Topaz Lake
B.C. MINFILE No 082KNE015: The Whitehorse claims, staked in 1960-61, covered the original magnesite discovery at the south end of Topaz Lake. The occurrence is a triangular shaped mass about 425 metres by 180 metres at the widest point. Drilling indicates 15 to 30 metres thickness of coarse- grained magnesite with 2 to 12 millimetre crystals underlain by a fine-grained cherty dolomite. The magnesite occurs in the trough of a northwest plunging syncline within the Mount Nelson dolomites and consists of a light to pearly grey rock with a rough rusty brown weathered surface. Visible impurities include quartz in scattered veinlets and grains as well as talc in minute shears.

Field Reconnaissance Results

Sample

Prospect

Al2O3%

CaO%

Fe2O3%

MgO%

SiO2%

14TOP-1

Topaz Lake

0.74

2.86

1.27

42.2

2.26

14TOP-2

Topaz Lake

0.73

1.98

1.73

40.1

7.44

14TOP-3

Topaz Lake

1.30

0.92

1.39

44.0

2.78

14TOP-4

Topaz Lake

0.81

0.51

1.13

42.8

10.35

14TOP-5

Topaz Lake

0.14

3.9

1.58

40.9

3.12

14TOP-6

Topaz Lake

0.30

0.54

1.46

42.5

5.63


          

Botts Creek
B.C. MINFILE No. 082KNE035: Botts Lake magnesite outcrops were traced over a distance of 118 metres along strike. The magnesite-bearing unit is at least 10 metres thick, strikes 130 degrees and dips 47 degrees east. The footwall consists of hard, aphanitic to fine-grained, dark grey to black dolomite which weathers pale grey. It is cut by pale grey dolomite and milky white quartz veinlets (<5 millimetres thick). Light to medium grey dolomite which weathers pale fawn in colour overlies the dark dolomite. The magnesite-bearing rock is snow white and weathers white or light grey. Field estimates indicate that the rock consists of a mixture of dolomite (40 to 70 per cent) and magnesite (30 to 60%) and is expected to have lower magnesia content than other magnesite deposits of the Brisco area. Traces of enargite (Cu3AsS4) were found in hairline fractures within this horizon.


Mount Assiniboine
B.C. MINFILE No. 082JNW014: The Mount Assiniboine occurrence area is underlain by carbonate, shale and phyllitic rocks of Middle Cambrian age which have been metamorphosed and uplifted into an anticlinal form. This anticlinal feature has its central axis located in the valley of Assiniboine Creek. West of this axis, the rocks dip from 5 to 35 degrees southwest and strike northwest from 310 to 355 degrees. East of the axis, the rocks are essentially flat-lying. The entire property is underlain at shallow depth by the Main Ranges thrust fault along which the rocks have moved eastward several kilometres.

Two distinct types of dolomite of the Middle Cambrian Cathedral Formation occur on the property. A "granola" textured dolomite is host to the magnesite mineralization and is generally underlain and sometimes enclosed by a tight, crystalline, sometimes argillaceous dolomite. The host rock which contains the magnesite mineralization is a very coarse-grained, recrystallized dolomite which occurs as massive, tan coloured, resistant outcrops. Magnesite mineralization in outcrop exposures is recognized by its extreme hardness, white colour, massive appearance and the presence of large rhombic crystals of dolomite spar with minor pyrite.

Two areas of significant buildup of coarse-grained magnesite- bearing dolomite were identified. The best area occurs in a cirque occupied by Eon Creek where 274 metres of Cathedral Formation hosts a 104 metre thick zone of rock which assays a high of 28.88 per cent MgO. The second area may represent the updip continuation of the Baymag orebody (082JNW001) to the south. The Cathedral Formation reaches a maximum thickness of 186 metres and contains 101 metres of favourable magnesite-bearing rock which assays a high of 43.07 per cent MgO (Assessment Report 19092).

Field Reconnaissance Results

Sample

Prospect

Al2O3%

CaO%

Fe2O3%

MgO%

SiO2%

14ASS-1

Mt. Assiniboine

<0.01

30.5

0.25

21.5

0.04

14ASS-2

Mt. Assiniboine

0.03

28.3

0.45

23.3

0.08

14ASS-3

Mt. Assiniboine

0.01

24.2

0.5

26.3

0.04

14ASS-4

Mt. Assiniboine

0.02

28.6

0.21

23.4

0.03

14ASS-5

Mt. Assiniboine

0.02

29.6

0.26

22.9

0.04

14ASS-6

Mt. Assiniboine

<0.01

28.9

0.22

23.6

0.02


Mount Eon

Field Reconnaissance Results

Sample

Prospect

Al2O3%

CaO%

Fe2O3%

MgO%

SiO2%

14EON-1

Mt. Eon

0.02

29.5

0.32

22.5

0.05

14EON-2

Mt. Eon

0.03

19.45

0.43

30.8

0.05

14EON-3

Mt. Eon

0.05

9.04

0.53

39.2

0.05

14EON-4

Mt. Eon

0.03

30.5

0.32

21.7

0.08

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